mag volume
mag selector
single coil mode switch

phase reverse

mag-piezo-both selector

piezo volume with
push-pull mid-range boost

Note that there's no stripes in the body or head... that's the edge of the sapwood, which doesn't appear on the back.

Imre de Jonge Guitars

Model i
in coffee & cream

 

 

(guitar pictured is #41)


It's an electric, acoustic-electric, and synth guitar...

A guitar that does it all...

The model i is a traditional shape, single cutaway with a 1-pce walnut neck through a black cherry body, satinwood fingerboard with rosewood edge binding and rosewood marker dots. The overall color scheme of the guitar is coffee & cream, with a very organic feel, furthered by a wooden bridge, pickup mounts, and nut.

It has 2 mini-size passsive Bartolini classic humbicking pickups as well as GraphTech Ghost piezo loaded bridge saddle pickups which feed into an on-board pre-amp for acoustic guitar sound. Because there are 6 individual pickups, the guitar can interface to a MIDI interpreter as well, through an add-on (piggyback) circuit board and 13-pin MIDI jack with Traktion switch.

Here's some audio samples:

Acoustic pickups only

Acoustic & both mags on, full mode.

 

Feel your wood...

 

A bare, polished neck is the fastest and most comfortable, staying non-sticky and drier, expecially with a porous wood like walnut.
 
  The lacquer fades off at the heel & nape; there's nothing like the feel of bare wood brought to a jet-smooth polish!
The fully adjustable Strat-style 2-pce bridge is 7 mm thick satinwood, matching the fingerboard.

 

The slots allow the acoustic pickup wires ample space for intonation adjutments without the risk of pinching, and the string holes are shaped to prevent kinking.

 

Some guitar players have been dubious about this idea of a wooden bridge with composite saddles. "That wouldn't work for me... I need steel saddles to cut through onstage" I've been told. That got me worried... I'm not a live guitarist... what if he's right? But this guitar is blowing that theory out of the water... it cuts like a knife, and clear as a bell.

The pickup mounts are 7 mm cross-laminated cherry.
Shop-made rosewood markers, ebony nut, and mother of pearl logo inlay.
The nut is held on by one screw for easy fretboard servicing.

Bartolini classic mini passive humbuckers; matched pair.

 

Graph Tech 'Ghost' piezo-acoustic saddles with the ACOUSTIPHONIC INTELLIGENT pre-amp.

Proudly Canadian products made in Vancouver. graphtech.com

Instead of idividual ferrules, the strings need a common metal retainer to be grounded, since the bridge and saddles are non-conductive. The 5mm aluminum anchor plate is overlaid by a 7mm thick satinwood block.
   
There are many different ways this hardware could be wired, but this default is a good start. There's still room for a few more components, if you wanted to add MIDI volume, blending, or patch switching.
The cross-laminated cherry battery holder closes flush with one thumb screw; no tools required.... you can just use a finger.

There's no wires to break off; when it's closed the connection is made.

The screw stays with the holder via a tight rubber grommet.

 

Price: $3,600 Cdn. Without MIDI: $3,300

SPECIFICATIONS:

Neck: 1-pce full length black walnut (no joints, except the head wings)

Body: 2 pce black cherry

Neck width @ nut: 43.5 mm Thickness: 20 mm

Bridge: 7mm thick satinwood Strat style (non temolo)

String spread at bridge: 56 mm

Scale length: 64.5 cm

Saddles: GraphTech Ghost composite self-lubricating Strat style with internal piezo pickups

Fingerboard: satinwood with rosewood binding, pearl edge dots, rosewood face dots String anchor: 5 mm grounded aluminum block with 7 mm satinwood overlay.

Tuning machines: Gotoh gold plated

Strap studs: Schaller flush strap locks, black

Battery holder: 12mm thick cross-laminated cherry. Wireless, connecting to contacts in the cavity and closing with a single flush thumb screw.

Cover plate: cherry laminated to sheet copper/aluminum

Shielding: full; aluminum or copper sheet on mounting deck, foil adhesive tape on side walls.

Jack: Switchcraft stereo jack with power on switch (piezo preamp auto-senses a stereo plug for splitting mag/piezo signals to different amps.)

Truss rod: full length of my own design and construction; adjusts at the body to keep the nape at the head as strong as possible. This design uses a flat 3/4" wide x 1/8" thick aluminum plate under the fingerboard to spread the pull widthwise, and is tensioned into a bend by a 3/16" steel rod underneath, anchored to it at the string nut and tightened with a Strat bullet nut in the heel. This dual-shaped channel is round on the bottom for a snug fit, and the entire assembly is silicone-filled to eliminate rattle or vibration.

 

Electonic controls: 1 mag volume (next to bridge), 3-pos. mag pickup blade switch, 1 mini toggle single coil mode, 1 mini toggle phase flip, 1 piezo volume for acoustic pickups with push/pull mid boost, 1 3-pos. mini toggle for mag/piezo/both selection. All pots are linear taper; no tone control is provided.

 

Pre-amp: Graph Tech Acoustiphonic "Intelligent," meaning it detects a stereo plug at the jack and splits the acoustic and mag signals for seperate processing. If a mono jack is plugged in, the signals are combined. It uses a 9-volt battery which lasts about 500 hours.

MIDI: Graphtech Hexpander interface board, 13-pin MIDI jack. Optional add: MIDI volume control, MIDI -guitar- both switch, and MIDI patch up-down switch. (guitar is pre-routed for MIDI jack whether optioned or not)

This particular guitar is currently available for sale. Please call/email to haggle about the price.

The raw state: I cut and planed this wood in the late 1980's, then put it away. The extra fretboard is for her sister.
 
 
 

 

Some more in-progress shots:

Time to slot the nut.

India ink on the first layer of lacquer.

The mounting deck is epoxied sheet aluminum, not foil, for reinforcement.

Just starting the wiring...

...and done!
Time for strings!
The matching cherry cover is laminated to sheet copper.

 

main guitar page

 
 

Imre de Jonge Guitars


Photography & website by Imre de Jonge